Where to go and what to do in the DC area to visit a historic ruin

As I browsed the Travel Channel late last month, I came across a breathtaking list of Washington landmarks that are in fact ruins. There are so many, mind you, none of which would be…

Where to go and what to do in the DC area to visit a historic ruin

As I browsed the Travel Channel late last month, I came across a breathtaking list of Washington landmarks that are in fact ruins.

There are so many, mind you, none of which would be bad places to visit. Which is what I plan to do once my five-month tour of the Charles H. Wright Museum for African American History is over.

If you like to explore Washington’s history, make sure to see the freeways.

Did you know there’s a Smithsonian that was built on the rubble left behind by the destruction of a man-made landmark in DC? It’s true. And it wasn’t even built in DC. It’s the ruins of the Brooklyn Bridge, the Manhatttan Parkway, FDR Drive, Memorial Bridge, Alfred E. Smith Memorial Bridge, Smithsonian Aviation and Space Museum, airport terminal that sits on top of the earth, and the World War II Memorial. You see the point I made?

The history of the Washington Monument is unbelievable (if you want to know how they named it after a treacherous volcano in Hawaii), and it’s a really good reason to do some serious history in DC. The first footbridge across the Mall is named for famed lawyer, Civil Rights activist, and Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall. You may not realize, however, that it once included some White House archives. After the Empire State Building opened in 1931, President Herbert Hoover never visited the White House. President Franklin D. Roosevelt attended the dedication of the building, but later moved to the Washington Monument.

For more sights, including the first video game arcade in the nation’s capital, click here.

Leave a Comment